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Publications

Ferguson, B., Perszyk, D. R., & Waxman, S. R. (in press). Very young infants’ responses to human and non-human primates’ vocalizations. Commentary on Ackermann, Hage, & Ziegler. Behavioral and Brain Sciences.

Taverna, A. S.; Waxman, S. R.; Medin, D. L., Moscoloni, N. & Peralta, O. A. (in press). Naming the living things: linguistic, experiential and cultural factors in Wichí and Spanish speaking children. Journal of Culture and Cognition.

Ferguson, B. & Waxman, S. R. (in press). Communication and categorization: New insights into the relation between speech, labels, and concepts for infants. In M. Knauff, M. Pauen, N. Sebanz, & I. Wachsmuth (Eds.), Proceedings of the 35th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Ferguson, B., Graf, E., & Waxman, S. R. (2014). Infants use known verbs to learn novel nouns: Evidence from 15- and 19-month-olds. Cognition, 131(1), 139-146.

Waxman, S., Herrmann, P., Woodring, J., Medin, D. (2014). Humans (really) are animals: Picture-book reading influences five-year-old urban children’s construal of the relation between humans and non-human animals. Frontiers in Developmental Psychology. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00172

ojalehto, b., Waxman, S.R. & Medin, D.L. (2013). Teleological reasoning about nature: intentional design or relational perspectives? Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 17(4), 166-171.

Ferry, A., Hespos, S., Waxman, S. (2013). Non-human primate vocalizations support categorization in very young human infants. PNAS,110(38), 15231–15235.

Dehghani, M., Bang, M., Medin, D.L., Marin, A., Leddon, E., Waxman, S. (2013). Epistemologies in the Text of Children’s Books: Native and non-Native Authored Books. International Journal of Science Education, 35(13), 2133-2151.

Arunachalam, S. Leddon, E., Song, H., Lee, Y., & Waxman, S. R. (2013). Doing more with less: Verb learning in Korean-acquiring 24-month-olds. Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 20(4), 292-304, DOI: 10.1080/10489223.2013.828059.

Waxman, S. Fu, X., Arunachalam, S. Leddon, E., Geraghty, K., & Song, H. (2013). Are nouns learned before verbs? Infants provide insight into a long-standing debate. Child Development Perspectives. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1111/cdep.12032.

Callanan, M. & Waxman, S.R. (2013). Commentary on Special Section. Deficit or Difference?  Interpreting Diverse Developmental Paths. Developmental Psychology, 49(1), 80-83.

Waxman, S.R. (2012). Social categories are shaped by social experience.Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 16(11), 531–532.

Waxman, S.R. and Grace, A.D. (2012). Developing gender- and race-based categories in infants:  Evidence from 7- and 11-month-olds. In G. Hayes & M. Bryant (Eds.), Psychology of Culture. In Psychology of Emotions, Motivations and Actions: Focus on Civilizations and Cultures Series. Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers.

Leddon, E., Waxman, S.R., Medin, D.L, Bang, M. & Washinawatok, K. (2012). One animal among many? Children’s understanding of the relation between humans and nonhuman animals. In G. Hayes & M. Bryant (Eds.), Psychology of Culture. In Psychology of Emotions, Motivations and Actions: Focus on Civilizations and Cultures Series. Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers.

Chen, M. L., & Waxman, S. R. (2012, July 23). “Shall We Blick?”: Novel Words Highlight

Waxman, S.R., & Goswami, U. (2012). Learning about language and literacy.  In S. Pauen & M. Bornstein (Eds.) Early childhood development and later achievement.  London: Cambridge University Press.

Arunachalam, S., Escovar, E., Hansen, M.A., & R. Waxman, S.R. (2012): Out of sight, but not out of mind: 21-month-olds use syntactic information to learn verbs even in the absence of a corresponding event, Language and Cognitive Processes,DOI:10.1080/01690965.2011.641744.

Taverna, A., Waxman, S., Medin, D., Peralta, O. (2012). Core-folkbiological concepts: New evidence from Wichí children and adults. Journal of Cognition and Culture, 12(3-4) 339–358.

Unsworth, S. J., Levin, W., Bang, M., Washinawatok, K., Waxman, S. R., & Medin, D. L. (2012). Cultural differences in children's ecological reasoning and psychological closeness to nature: Evidence from Menominee and European-American children. Journal of Cognition and Culture, 12(1-2),17-29.

Graham, S.A., Booth, A., Waxman, S.R. (2012). Words are Not Merely Features: Only Consistently Applied Nouns Guide 4-year-olds’ Inferences about Object Categories.  Language Learning and Development, 8, 1-11.

Herrmann, P., Medin, D.L., Waxman, S.R. (2012). When Humans Become Animals: Development of the Animal Category in Early Childhood. Cognition, 122(1), 74-79. available online: doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2011.08.011

Shenton, J., Ross, N., Kohut, M. & Waxman, S. (2011). Maya Folk Botany and Knowledge Devolution: Modernization and Intra-community Variability in the Acquisition of Folkbotanical Knowledge,Ethos, 39(3), 349-367.

Arunachalam, S., Escovar, E., Hansen, M. A., and Waxman, S. R. (2011). Verb learning from syntax alone at 21 months. In: N. Danis, K. Mesh, & H. Sung (Eds.), Proceedings of the 35th Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development, 21-24.

Waxman, S. & Leddon, E. (2011). Early word learning and conceptual development: Everything had a name, and each name gave birth to a new thought.  In U. Goswami (Ed.) The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Cognitive Development (pp. 180-208). Malden, MA:Wiley-Blackwell.

Leddon, E.M., Waxman, S.R., Medin, (2011). What does it mean to 'live' and 'die'? A cross-linguistic analysis of parent-child conversations in English and Indonesian. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 29(3): 375-395.

Leddon, E.M., Arunachalam, S., Waxman, S.R., Fu, X., Gong, H., & Wang, L. (2011). Noun- and verb-learning in Mandarin-acquiring 24-month-olds.  In N. Danis, K. Mesh, & H. Sung (Eds.), Proceedings of the 35th Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.

Waxman, S.R., & Goswami, U. (in press). Learning about language and literacy.  In S. Pauen & M. Bornstein (Eds.) Early childhood development and later achievement.  London: Cambridge University Press.

Waxman, S.R. & Leddon, E.M. (2011). Early Word Learning and Conceptual Development: Everything Had a Name, and Each name Gave Birth to  New Thought. In U. Goswami (Ed.) The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Cognitive Development (pp. 180-208). Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.

Medin, D., Waxman S., et al., (2010).  Diversity in the Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences.  White paper for the Directorate for the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences of the National Science Foundation (NSF/SBE). http://www.nsf.gov/sbe/sbe_2020/index.cf

Fennell, C. & Waxman, S.R.. (2010). What paradox? Referential cues allow for infant use of phonetic detail in word learning. Child Development, 81(5), 1376–1383.

Weisleder, A. & Waxman, S. R. (2010). What’s in the input? Frequent frames in child-directed speech offer distributional cues to grammatical categories in Spanish and English.  Journal of Child Language, 37 (2010), 1089–1108. First published online August 24, 2009 doi: 10.1017/S0305000909990067.

Arunachalam, S., & Waxman, S. R. (2010). Specifying the role of linguistic information in verb learning. In: K.Franich, K. Iserman, & L. Keil (Eds.), Proceedings of the 34th Annual

Arunachalam, S. & Waxman, S.R (2010). Language and Conceptual Development. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: WIRE’s Cognitive Science, 1(4), 548-558.

Medin, D., Waxman, S., Woodring, J., & Washinawatok, K. (2010). Human-centeredness is not a universal feature of young children’s reasoning: Culture and experience matter when reasoning about biological entities. Cognitive Development, 25(3), 197-207.

Arunachalam, S. & Waxman, S.R (2010). Meaning from syntax: Evidence from 2-year-olds. Cognition, 114(3), 442-446.

Waxman, S. (2010). Names will never hurt me? Naming and the development of racial and gender categories in preschool-aged children. European Journal of Social Psychology, 40(4), 593-610.

Anggoro, F., Medin, D. & Waxman, S. (2010).  Language and Experience Influence Children’s Biological Induction.  Journal of Cognition and Culture, 10, 171-187.

Winkler-Rhoades, N., Medin, D. L., Waxman, S. R., & Woodring, J., Ross, N. O. (2010). Naming the animals that come to mind: Effects of culture and experience on category fluency. Journal of Cognition and Culture, 10, 205-220.

Ferry, A., Hespos, S.,  & Waxman, S. (2010). Categorization in 3- and 4-Month-Old Infants: An Advantage of Words Over Tones. Child Development, 81(2), 472-479.

Herrmann, P.,  Waxman, S.R.,  & Medin, D.L. (2010). Anthropocentrism is not the first step in children's reasoning about the natural world. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(22), 9979-9984.

Waxman S.R. & Gelman, S. A.  (2010). Different kinds of concepts and different kinds of words: What words do for human cognition. In Mareschal, Quinn & Lea (Eds.) The making of human concepts. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Waxman, S.R., (2009). Learning from infants’ first verbs.  Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development. Comment on Naigles et al. 74(2), 127-132. 

Weisleder, A. & Waxman, S. R. (2009). What’s the input? Frequent frames for nouns, adjectives and verbs: new evidence from Spanish. Journal of Child Language. online: doi: 10.1017/S0305000909990067.

Waxman, S. R. & Guasti, M. T. (2009). Nouns, adjectives and the aquisition of meaning: New evidence from Italian-acquiring children. Language Learning and Development.5 (1), 50-68.

Waxman, S.R., Gelman, S.A. (2009). Early word-learning entails reference, not merely associations.  Trends in Cognitive Sciences,13(6), 258-263.

Booth, A.E. & Waxman, S.R. (2009).  A Horse of a Different Color: Specifying with Precision Infants' Mappings of Novel Nouns and Adjectives. Child Development. 80(1), 15-22.

Leddon, E. M., Waxman, S.R. & Medin, D.L. (2008) Unmasking “alive:” Children’s appreciation of a concept linking all living things. Journal of Cognition and Development.9(4): 461-473.

Norbury, H.M., Waxman, S. R., & Song H. (2008). Tight and loose are not created equal: An asymmetry underlying the representation of fit in English and Korean speakers. Cognition. 109: 316-325.

Gelman, S., Waxman, S., Kleinberg, F. (2008). The Role of Representational Status and Item Complexity in Parent-Child Conversations about Pictures and Objects. Cognitive Development. 23, 313-323.

Anggoro, F. K., Waxman, S.R. & Medin, D.L. (2008). Naming Practices and the Acquisition of Key Biological Concepts: Evidence from English and Indonesian. Psychological Science. 19(4), 314-319.

Booth, A.E. & Waxman, S.R. (2008). Taking Stock as Theories Take Shape. Developmental Science. 11(2), 185-194.

Waxman, S.R. (2008).  All in Good Time: How do Infants Discover Distinct Types of Words and Map Them to Distinct Kinds of Meaning? in J. Colombo, P. McCardle & L. Freund (Eds.), Infant Pathways to Language: Methods, Models, and Research Directions. (pp. 99-118).   Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Piccin, T. B. & Waxman, S. R. (2007). Why nouns trump verbs in word learning: new evidence from children and adults in the Human Simulation Paradigm. Language Learning and Development. 3(4), 295-323.

Fulkerson, A. L., Waxman, S. R. (2007). Words (but not Tones) Facilitate Object Categorization: Evidence From 6- and 12-Month-Olds. Cognition. 105(1) 218-228.

Medin, D.L. & Waxman, S. R. (2007). Interpreting asymmetries of projection in children's inductive reasoning.  In A. Feeney & E. Heit (Eds.), Inductive Reasoning . New York , NY : Cambridge University Press.

Fennell, C.T, Waxman, S.R., Weisleder, A. (2007).  With Referential Cues, Infants Successfully Use Phonetic Detail in Word Learning. Proceedings of the 31st Boston University Conference on Language Development. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.

Waxman, S.R., Medin, D.L., & Ross, N. (2007). Folkbiological reasoning from a cross-cultural developmental perspective: Early essentialist notions are shaped by cultural beliefs. Developmental Psychology. 43(2), 294-308.

Waxman, S.R. & Medin, D.L (2007). Experience and Cultural Models Matter: Placing firm limits on anthropocentrism. Human Development. 50(1), 23-30.

Medin, D.L. & Waxman, S.R. (2006). Giyoo Hatano. Cognitive Studies, 13(2), 177-180.

Waxman, S.R. (2006).Tudo tinha um nome, e de cada nome nascia um novo pensamento: vinculos entre aprendizagem de palavras e organização conceptual no início da aquisição da linguagem (Everything had a name, and each name gave birth to a new thought: Links between early word-learning and conceptual organization) in Corrêa, L. M. S. (Ed.). Aquisição da Linguagem e Problemas do Desenvolvimento Lingüístico. Rio de Janeiro: Editora da PUC-Rio.

Fennell, C.T. (2006).  Infants of 14 Months use phonetic detail in novel words embedded in naming phrases.  In Bamman, D., Magnitskaia, T., & Zaller, C. (Eds.) Proceedings of the 30th Boston University Conference on Language Development (pp. 178-189). Cascadilla Press.

Fulkerson, A. L., Waxman, S. R., & Seymour, J. M. (2006).  Linking object names and object categories: Words (but not tones) facilitate object categorization in 6- and 12-month-olds. In Bamman, D., Magnitskaia, T., & Zaller, C. (Eds.) Supplement to the Proceedings of the 30th Boston University Conference on Language Development. Cascadilla Press.

Waxman, Sandra R. (2006). Finding the points of contact: Language acquisition in children raised in monolingual, bilingual and multilingual environments.  In W. Li (Series Ed.) & P. McCardle & E. Hoff (Vol. Eds.), Child Language & Child Development Childhood Bilingualism - Research on Infancy Through School Age. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Namy, L.L. & Waxman, S.R. (2005).  Symbols redefined.  In Namy, L.L.  (Ed.) Symbol use and symbolic representation, 269-277. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Gelman, S.A., Chesnick, R., & Waxman, S.R.  (2005).  Mother-child conversations about pictures and objects: Referring to categories and individuals.  Child Development, 76(6), 1129-1143.

Anggoro, F.K., Waxman, S.R., & Medin, D.L. (2005). The effects of naming practices on children's understanding of living things.  In B. Bara, L. Barsalou, & M. Bucciarelli (Eds) Proceedings of the Twenty-seventh Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, 139-144. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 

Lidz, Jeffrey & Waxman, Sandra R. (2004). Reaffirming the Poverty of the Stimulus Argument: A reply to the replies. Cognition, 93(2), 157-165. 

Lidz, Jeffrey, Waxman, Sandra R. & Freedman, Jennifer (2003). What infants know about syntax but couldn’t have learned: Experimental evidence for syntactic structure at 18 months. Cognition, 89, B65-B73. 

Booth, Amy E & Waxman, Sandra R. (2003). Bringing theories of word learning in line with the evidence.  Cognition, 87(3), 215-218. 

Waxman, Sandra R., & Booth, Amy E. (2003). The origins and evolution of links between word learning and conceptual organization: New evidence from 11-month-olds. Developmental Science, 6(2), p 130 – 137. 

Booth, Amy E. & Waxman, Sandra R. (2002). Object names and object functions serve as cues to categories for infants. Developmental Psychology. 38 (6), 948-957. 

Namy, Laura L., & Waxman, Sandra R. (2002). Patterns of spontaneous production of novel words and gestures within an experimental setting in children ages 1;6 and 2;2. Journal of Child Language, 29 (4), 911-921. 

Waxman, Sandra R. (2002). Links between object categorization and naming: Origins and emergence in human infants. In D. H. Rakison, & L. M. Oakes (Eds.), Early category and concept development: Making sense of the blooming, buzzing confusion. NY, New York: Oxford University Press.

Booth, Amy E., & Waxman, Sandra R. (2002). Word learning is ‘smart’: Evidence that conceptual information effects preschoolers’ extension of novel words. Cognition, 84(1), B11-B22. 

Waxman, Sandra R. (2002). Not by perception alone: Conceptual and semantic factors underlying children’s extension of novel adjectives. In B. Skarabela, S. Fish, & A. H.-J. Do (Eds.), Proceedings of the 26th Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development (pp. 746-757).  Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press. 

Waxman, Sandra R. (2002). Early word learning and conceptual development: Everything had a name, and each name gave birth to a new thought. In. U. Goswami (Ed.), Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Cognitive Development (pp. 102-126). Oxford UK: Blackwell Publishers. 

Waxman, Sandra R. (2001).  Word extension: A key to early word learning and domain-specificity. Commentary on P. Bloom.  Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 24(6), 1121-1122. 

Waxman, Sandra R., & Booth, Amy E. (2001). Seeing pink elephants: Fourteen-month-olds’ interpretations of novel nouns and adjectives. Cognitive Psychology, 43(3), 217-242. 

Waxman, Sandra R., & Booth, Amy E. (2001). On the insufficiency of domain-general accounts of word-learning: A reply to Bloom and Markson. Cognition, 78, 277-279. 

Namy,  Laura L., & Waxman, Sandra R. (2000). Naming and exclaiming: Infants’ sensitivity to naming contexts.  Journal of Cognition and Development, 1(4), 405-428. 

Waxman, Sandra R., & Booth, Amy E. (2000). Principles that are invoked in the acquisition of words, but not facts. Cognition, 77, B33-B43. 

Waxman, Sandra R., & Klibanoff, Raquel S. (2000). The role of comparison in the extension of novel adjectives. Developmental Psychology, 36(5), 571-581. 

Waxman, Sandra R., & Booth, Amy E. (2000). Distinguishing count nouns from adjectives: Evidence from 14-month-olds’ word extension. In Proceedings of the 24th Boston University Conference on Language Development. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press. 

Waxman, Sandra R. (1999). The dubbing ceremony revisited: Object naming and categorization in infancy and early childhood. In D. L. Medin & S. Atran (Eds.), Folkbiology (pp. 233-284). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press/Bradford Books. 

Klibanoff, Raquel S., & Waxman, Sandra R. (1998). Preschoolers’ acquisition of novel adjectives and the role of basic-level kind. In A. Greenhill et al. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 22nd Boston University Conference on Language Development (pp. 442-453). Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press. 

Waxman, Sandra R. (1989). Linking language and conceptual development: Linguistic cues and the construction of conceptual hierarchies. Genetic Epistemologist, 17(2), 13-20. 

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